Aqueduct of the Silver Water

Evora.aqueduct.jpg

The Silver Water Aqueduct, also known as the Silver Aqueduct, is a complex and extensive work of Renaissance hydraulic engineering with the purpose of supplying the city of Évora with water. 

 

The Silver Water aqueduct was built between 1531 and 1537, covering an area of about 18 km from the Silver Fountain (water sources) in a place called Graça do Divor, within the grounds of the Convent of São Bento de Castris until the Chafariz da Praça Grande (now Praça do Giraldo, Giraldo’s Square), right in the center of the city of Évora. It was ordered to build by King João III, with project of the royal architect Francisco of Arruda. 

 

Over the centuries the aqueduct has undergone some changes, including the construction of fountains along the route through the historical centre of Évora. 

 

It was restored in the 18th century due to damage caused during the Restoration Wars. The works that occurred in the 19th and 20th centuries did not change their original general trait. 

 

The most recent intervention at this monument was made recently when the surrounding fields were cleared throughout. 

 

The monument was included in the Environmental Routes of Évora. From the aqueduct it is possible to make the Route of the Water of the Silver - on foot or by bicycle and with three possible accesses) - are 8,3 km (only one way) of environmental route, along the section that was restored in the 19th century, always with panoramic views over Évora, and always in contact with nature, crossing fields of montado and farms. 

 

It has been classified as a National Monument since 1910. It is an integral part of the Historical Centre of Évora included UNESCO World Heritage List since 1986. 

 

The aqueduct is one of the few of this epoch that continues to function today, contributing to the supply of the city. Due to the strong need for preservation, the aqueduct entered the Biennial List of the World Monuments Watch.